Manitoba Book Reaches #1 on Amazon Hot New Releases Bestseller List

Morden, Manitoba; Aug. 5, 2022// Morden, Manitoba writer and poet Peter Cantelon’s first collection of poetry entitled Psalms of Bone & Sinew reached number one on Amazon’s Hot New Releases list. The book currently sits in the top three Hot New Releases in Canada for poetry.

“It’s gratifying to have watched this unfold,” said Cantelon. “My vision for this book was simply to see it published, hitting the best seller lists never occurred to me.”

Cantelon’s book also managed to crack Amazon’s Hot New Releases Bestseller list that encompasses all genre’s of books in Canada, appearing at number 70 as of press time. Amazon currently has more than 60,000 books for sale on it’s Canadian website.

This collection of poetry is meant to evoke the messy reality that is life (at least life as lived by the author) developing the idea of psalms as words lifted in praise and grief, horror and wonder.

Cantelon started writing poetry when he was 17 years old in his hometown of Guelph, Ontario where he first heard the great Canadian author Timothy Findley read (and got his first author’s signed copy of a book).

Cantelon has had a life-long passion for writing and poetry and has been scribbling continuously for more than 36 years now. If there is a single, uninterrupted thread in his life it is his writing, which has evolved as he moved to Ottawa; Orlando, Florida; Toronto and ultimately Morden where he lives with his wife in the city’s oldest house, a 130 year old field stone structure.

Cantelon’s poetry reflects his attention to meter, rhythm and structure. Most of his poems are free verse with a mix of rhyming and what he calls free-rhyme (a mix of free verse and rhyme in a single poem). Cantelon’s influences have been many and diverse including but not limited to Margaret Atwood, Irving Layton, Sappho, Charles Bukowski, Edgar Allan Poe, John Donne, Ted Hughes and more recently international writers such as Japanese poet Kenji Miyazawa, Ukrainian poet Todos Osmachka and Persian poet Forough Farrokhzad.

His poems have been published in various and sundry journals and magazines including Poetry Scotland, Synaesthesia, Bricolage, Geez Magazine and the award-winning Lakeview International Journal of Literature and Arts.

Cantelon is the executive director of the Winnipeg-based non-profit The Jubilee Fund and has been a regular award-winning columnist for more than 12 years with the Winkler-Morden Voice. For almost eight years he was executive director of the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre.

The 121 page volume – Psalms of Bone & Sinew can be purchased at Amazon.

For more information visit www.cantelon.org/books or contact the author at 204-823-0598 or email Cantelon@gmail.com.

PHOTOS (credit Peter Cantelon): Book cover; Bestseller list image; Author headshot

sometimes i see in green

i see in blue, sometimes
and the world is a shallow lake
to comfortably drown in

i see in grey, sometimes
and the world is a deep ocean
cold and crushing in the dark

i see in orange, sometimes
and the world is the blazing sun
that burns the waters away

i see in red, sometimes
and the world is empty Mars
impotent anger beneath blood skies

but

sometimes i see in green
and life is lush and urgent
a fertile and consuming heart

life is a prism
that splits and scatters
until i am pieces against a wall

loss

there is the warm sun
and there is you lying, soft, with in it
there is the luxurious light
and there is you bathed golden in it
and there is you and everything as it should be
a perfect balance of life’s loving laughter
in a never ending Elysium

then the world slips,
just a little,
such an imperceptible jolt.
like falling yourself awake;
almost, you did not notice
but everything is different now
a slightly broken wholeness pervades.

pretend it never happened
as though nothing changed
and try to feel/grasp the warmth
like a lover lost just out of reach
but the voice behind the voice behind the voice
that sings mournful quiet behind your eyes
tells you that your world has broken
that loss has lighted and come to rest nearby
and you are locked behind glass
watching the good that was slide away
while you get colder in the deepening shadow
and you get colder in the deepening shadow